Posted by: dbjaquith | August 30, 2015

Summer 2015

Mid-July garden

Mid-July garden

Once a year I post about my summer here on the Self-Directed Art blog. This has been a glorious summer! In spite of starting six days late (due to snow last February) it felt like a very long and full season. My summer started with the second annual TAB Institute Summer Teacher Institute which ran for a week in early July at Massachusetts College of Art & Design.

Forty eight teachers spent a week together in Boston learning about learner-directed pedagogy at the Teaching for Artistic Behavior Summer Institute.

Forty eight teachers spent a week together in Boston learning about learner-directed pedagogy at the Teaching for Artistic Behavior Summer Institute.

As director, I work with the college to plan a fulfilling week of graduate level professional development on the topic of choice-based teaching and learning. This year 42 teachers came from 20 different states along with faculty from Massachusetts, Indiana, Illinois and North Carolina. The week went fast, with in-depth discussions about curriculum, assessment, media and strategies to deepen learning for our PreK-12 students. This year’s participants are a hard-working and lively group of dedicated professionals. It was a fabulously fun week together!

The Tusket River in Nova Scotia is brownish and bubbly, due to all the peat under the water.

The Tusket River in Nova Scotia is brownish and bubbly, due to all the peat under the water.

Soon after my husband and I joined friends and set sail for Nova Scotia. We spent several foggy days on this remote and beautiful island, relaxing in “Bear Cottage” in the woods by a lake. We did not see any bears but a very cute porcupine came to visit us on the deck one afternoon. Whales, seals and pods of dolphins escorted us home on the ferry back to Portland.

A frequent visitor to the feeder!

A frequent visitor to the feeder

The rest of the summer was spent in Gloucester looking out on Ipswich Bay, where I had fully intended to get a lot of writing completed. That didn’t happen! Instead I found myself in the garden, tending to the ever-changing show of color. The humming- birds visited often and, though I tried to get some good photographs, my camera is too slow for their fast speed. Did you know that hummingbirds will buzz your head if you get too close to their feeder?

All of these artworks are still in-progress and will continue to evolve over time.

All of these artworks are still in-progress and will continue to evolve over time. Some are more realistic than others as you can see.

Oil sticks and paint sticks are great fun to work with on canvas!

Oil sticks and paint sticks are great fun to work with on canvas!

A week-long class at Montserrat College of Art with painter Dean Nimmer on abstract art has inspired me to create new artwork. I had been painting landscapes for a few years but want to become less realistic so Dean’s exercises have helped me to gradually start the transition to abstraction. One starting point I like is to trace shadows onto a canvas and then work off the shapes. This results in organic forms that can fill a composition. I also switched from oil paints to oil sticks, essentially oil paint in stick-form so I can draw with paint! Paint sticks feel less demanding than oil paints to me so I can work more freely, usually on 3-4 pieces at a time, and just play with color and form. As you can see, I have a ways to go as the work seems to naturally represent something recognizable.

Lots of creatures live in and around these rocks and are fun to discover.

Lots of creatures live in and around these rocks and are fun to discover.

My Gloucester neighborhood has been my summer home since childhood. The people, the landscape, the tides, water and sky are all familiar constants. An annual highlight is the Perseids meteor shower and this year, with the new moon, it was spectacular! Our coast is quite rocky with a sandbar that emerges at low tide. I like to walk the beach to see what creatures, textures and colors appear in my camera lens. We face west, toward Cranes Beach and Plum Island. My evening ritual includes photographing the sunset and I am often joined by my neighbors. For us, this is our fireworks, a beautiful light and color show provided daily by nature.

A July sunset captures summer's glow.

A July sunset captures summer’s glow.

Like many of you I am preparing for a new school year, full of children’s art making and the myriad of surprises that appear each day in our Creativity Studio. When students have autonomy to direct their learning, their teacher gets the joy of watching them to see what will happen next. Being an art teacher is a wonderful job and I am so proud to be a part of this amazing profession!


Responses

  1. What a fulfilling summer and a great step into your fall classroom, Diane. Look forward to your posts this year!

    • Thanks Kathleen! We are gearing up for a new year of learning through art making and I can’t wait to see what the artists create!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: