Posted by: dbjaquith | April 13, 2014

Tantalize!

Mrs. Dunn's tape dispenser was one of the first objects to be Tantalized.

Mrs. Dunn’s tape dispenser was one of the first objects to be Tantalized.

A sign on the door shows where to donate objects.

A sign on the door shows where to donate objects.

On Friday the Tantalizer made an appearance at Franklin School! The idea for the Tantalizer comes from Mary Olson, a Santa Fe, NM art teacher and friend who introduced “The Tantamount” to her students. The word “tantamount” means “equivalent to.” The Tantamount is a human art machine that duplicates the essence of an object into a complementary art object.

A sign announces the Tantalizer.

A sign announces the Tantalizer.

We altered the concept slightly and renamed our art making machine “The Tantalizer,” an art temptation. Adults in our school community were invited to bring a favorite object to the art room to be tantalized. Third grade Tantalizer

Mr. Pepicelli's spray bottle

Mr. Pepicelli’s spray bottle – form over function!

Teams worked collaboratively to interpret donated objects through a wide variety of materials. Upon completion, they delivered the objects and artworks back to their lucky owners.

We had tremendous fun with the Tantalizer! Special thanks to Mary Olson and Kathy Douglas, our guests for the day, who assisted Tantalizers in their creative work.

Ms. Foster's skeleton got a makeover.

Ms. Foster’s skeleton got a makeover.


Responses

  1. Reblogged this on CRAFT in DC and commented:
    Hey guys… here’s a little motivation to get your week started. I know that many of you are on Spring Break but I think you’ll love this lesson! It holds all the greatness of creative reuse, choice based classrooms, and fun that you will need once you return to school and get out of the testing fog!

  2. I really love this post! What a great idea… thanks for sharing. I’m reblogging this on my blog because I loved it so much.

  3. thanks for posting – I am always glad to find people who are not just churning out the Matisse or Van Gogh inspired (NOT inspired) parrotting brand of art making


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: